Conditions

Here at Snibbe Orthopedics, we are advocates for educating our patients about your condition and the various treatment options available to you. Please click on the conditions below for detailed explanations and the courses of treatment for each.

This information can assist in diagnosing your orthopedic issue. However, please keep in mind that this information is intended for educational purposes only. In order to fully assess your injury, a comprehensive history and physical exam must be performed by Dr. Snibbe. We encourage you to come into our office to meet with Dr. Snibbe and discuss all available treatment options together.

Filter Conditions by:     AllShoulderElbowHipKnee
adhesive-capsulitis

Adhesive Capsulitis

Adhesive Capsulitis is a condition that describes the loss of motion of the shoulder. Commonly referred to as “frozen shoulder,” patients with this condition experience a significant amount of shoulder stiffness, loss of motion, and pain. Treatment for frozen shoulder often includes medications, physical therapy, and sometimes surgical is necessary.

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ru_b_ten

Biceps Tendon Rupture at Shoulder

A ruptured biceps tendon describes when the long head of the biceps muscle is pulled from its attachment at the shoulder or the elbow. This can happen as a result of lifting a heavy item or a jerking motion while your arm is flexed. Most commonly a patient will notice a deformity of the biceps muscle where there is an abnormal bulge in the arm.

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Anatomy of Biceps Tendonitis.

Biceps Tendonitis

Biceps tendonitis is an inflammation of the upper part of the biceps tendon. This is common in people who perform repetitive overhead activities or repetitive lifting. Pain is usually sharp and felt in the front of the shoulder. Treatment often includes medications, injections, and physical therapy.

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Rotator cuff being pinched with resulting inflammation

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement, also known as swimmer’s or thrower’s shoulder, occurs when the rotator cuff is pinched and becomes inflamed. Patients experience pain with overhead activity, reaching, pushing, or pulling motions, as well as pain at night. Impingement is often treated with conservative means including physical therapy and medications, etc.

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shoulder_instability_intro01

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder Instability is a condition that occurs as a result of recurrent shoulder subluxation or dislocation. Patients will comment that his/her shoulder feels like it is popping in and out of the socket. Treatment for shoulder instability is dependent on the age of the patient and the type of activity they participate in.

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OA-Shoulder

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the Shoulder

Osteoarthritis of the shoulder is the loss of cartilage that covers the ball and socket of the shoulder joint. Patients will experience stiffness, pain in the shoulder, upper arm, and neck and can often have trouble performing over head activities or lifting heavy items. Treatment for shoulder osteoarthritis includes physical therapy, medications, injections, and possibly surgery.

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ro_c_tea

Rotator Cuff Tear / Tendonitis

Rotator cuff tendonitis describes the inflammation of the rotator cuff muscles in the shoulder and is often caused by repetitive pushing, pulling, or heavy lifting activities. Tendonitis can lead to tears of the rotator cuff and a person may develop weakness in his/her arm because of the tear. Rotator cuff tear and tendonitis are treated with physical therapy, medications, and sometimes arthroscopic surgery.

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RC-arthropathy

Rotator Cuff Arthropathy

Rotator cuff arthropathy is a condition resulting from long-standing rotator cuff tears in the shoulder. Patients develop a severe loss of motion of the arm and weakness and will experience difficulty and pain with lifting, pushing, and pulling motions. There are both non-operative and surgical treatments for this condition.

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labral-tear

SLAP / Labrum Tear

The labrum is a pad of cartilage that lines the shoulder joint. Commonly, patients will injure the labrum as a result of repetitive motion such as throwing or swimming. A “SLAP” tear is a frequently used term to describe a tear that extends from the front of the back of the labrum. Treatment for labral tears involves medications, physical therapy, and possibly arthroscopic surgery.

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biceps-rupture

Biceps Tendon Rupture at Elbow

A ruptured biceps tendon describes when the tendon of the biceps muscle is pulled from its attachment at the shoulder or the elbow. This can happen as a result of lifting a heavy item or a jerking motion while your arm is flexed. Most commonly a patient will notice a deformity of the biceps muscle where there is an abnormal bulge in the arm.

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elbow_latepi_intro01

Lateral Epicondylitis

Lateral epicondylitis results from inflammation of the extensor tendons of the wrist. Although most people with this condition do not play tennis, it is referred to frequently as “tennis elbow.” Patients will have pain with lifting, twisting of the wrist, or hitting a backhand in tennis. Treatment involves physical therapy, medications, injections, and sometimes surgery.

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elbow_medepi_intro01

Medial Epicondylitis

Medial epicondylitis results from inflammation of the flexor tendons of the wrist. It is commonly referred to as “golfer’s elbow.” Patients will have pain with lifting, twisting of the wrist, or during a golf swing. Treatment involves physical therapy, medications, injections, and sometimes surgery.

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triceps-tear

Triceps Tendon Tear

The triceps tendon attaches the triceps muscles on the back of the arm to the elbow. Often a tear or rupture of this tendon occurs as a result of a fall on an outstretched hand or when sudden force is exerted on the elbow. Patients commonly report a pop or snapping sound at the time of injury. Depending on the extent of tearing, surgery to repair the tendon may be necessary.

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hip-impingement1

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) is a condition where the ball of the hip and the socket of the hip rub together and cause damage to the cartilage of the hip joint. Patients with FAI complain of soreness and aching with occasional sharp pains in the hip. Treatment for FAI varies greatly to include medications, physical therapy, and possibly arthroscopic surgery.

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Crowe-I_mainThumb

Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition where there is a lack of coverage of the hip socket over the ball of the hip. Patients with hip dysplasia will feel a sense of instability in the hip as if it is gliding in and out of place. Patients with this condition are at increased risk for labrum injuries in the hip. Treatment for this can include physical therapy, medications, and sometimes arthroscopic surgery.

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flexor-tendonitis

Flexor Tendonitis

Flexor tendonitis is a condition where the tendons in the front of the hip joint become inflamed and irritated. This is frequently the result of repetitive hip flexion such as with track athletes, gymnasts, and soccer players. Patients will experience soreness and occasional sharp pains in the front of the hip. Treatment for flexor tendonitis includes medications and physical therapy.

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gluteus-medius-tear

Gluteus Medius Tear

The gluteus medius is a muscle that allows us to move our leg out to the side and away from the body. Patients can suffer a tear of this gluteus medius tendon resulting in buttock pain and weakness with lifting the leg to the side. Treatment varies for this injury, but is commonly resolved with medication and physical therapy.

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knee_hamstring_symptom01a

Hamstring Tear / Rupture

The hamstring is a muscle in the back of the leg that is a source of many sports-related injuries. This muscle is often strained with a person exerts a lot of force on the leg as in running or sprinting. Patients can tear the hamstring tendon as well and will commonly report feeling a pop at the base of the buttock. Hamstring strains resolve over time; however, a ruptured hamstring will require surgical repair.

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Iliotibial-band-syndrome1

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

The iliotibial band, also known as IT band, is a thick band of tissue extending from the pelvis to the knee along the outside of the leg. With overuse activities such as running, this band can become inflamed and cause pain at the hip and the knee. Treatment for IT band syndrome includes medications, physical therapy, and possible injections and/or surgery if necessary.

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labrum-tear

Labrum Tear

The labrum is cartilage in the hip which lines the outer lip of the hip socket (acetabulum). Damage to the labrum can occur as a result of trauma or from femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Patients with a torn labrum will experience a deep pain in the groin area which is sore, aching, and sometimes sharp. Patients may also notice a decreased range of motion and pain with sitting. Treatment for a torn labrum includes conservative care as well as possibly arthroscopic surgery to repair the damaged labrum.

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OA-hip

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the Hip

Osteoarthritis of the hip is the loss of cartilage in the hip joint. Patients with osteoarthritis will experience groin and buttock pain, stiffness in the hip, and pain with sitting and walking. Treatment for osteoarthritis of the hip can include medications, physical therapy, injections, and joint replacement surgery.

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IT band snapping across greater trochanter of the hip

Snapping Hip – External

An external snapping hip is when the patient experiences a snapping sensation on the outside of the hip that is painful. This is often a result of a tight iliotibial band (IT band). Treatment for external snapping hip syndrome may include medications, physical therapy, and sometimes surgical intervention.

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snapping-hip-internal

Snapping Hip – Internal

Internal snapping hip is a condition where a patient has a snapping sensation when the leg is brought from a flexed position to a straight leg position. The snapping can sometimes be painful and cause discomfort when a person is exercising. Treatment for internal snapping hip may include medications, physical therapy, and possibly arthroscopic surgery.

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TrochantericBursitis1

Trochanteric Bursitis

Trochanteric bursitis is inflammation of a fluid-filled sac on the side on the hip. This is often a result of a tight IT band. Patients will experience soreness and pain on the side of the hip, as well as difficulty with sleeping on their side. Treatment involves medications, physical therapy, injections, and sometimes requires surgery.

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acl-injury-anatomy1

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a stabilizing ligament for the knee. A tear of the ACL often results from a twisting or hyperextension episode of the knee. At the time of injury, an audible pop is commonly heard. Treatment for an ACL tear will include arthroscopic reconstruction of the ACL.

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bakers-cyst1

Baker’s Cyst

A Baker’s cyst, also known as a popliteal cyst, is a condition of the knee where the bursa sac in the back of the knee becomes inflamed and often fills with fluid. Treatment for a Baker’s cyst may include aspiration (removal of the fluid), medications, and possibly physical therapy.

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Pateller Tendonitis

Patellar Tendonitis

Patellar Tendonitis, also known as Jumper’s Knee, is an overuse condition of the knee that is a result of jumping or kicking sports. Patients with this condition will experience pain in the front of the knee below the knee cap. Treatment for patellar tendonitis includes medications, physical therapy, and cold therapy.

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mcl-tear

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Sprain

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a knee stabilizing ligament that is on the inside aspect of the knee. This ligament is prone to injury when a patient experiences a traumatic hit to the outside aspect of the knee which forces the knee inward. Treatment for MCL tears involves medications, physical therapy, and bracing.

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meniscus-injuries-and-tears1

Meniscus Injury

A meniscus injury describes when the cartilage pad in the knee joint is torn. The meniscus acts as a shock absorber in the knee and is injured during an episode of the knee twisting while the foot is planted. Symptoms of a meniscus tear include pain with squatting and twisting motions, or a catching and locking sensation in the knee. Treatment for a meniscus tear includes medication, physical therapy, and possibly surgery.

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knee-osteoarthritis1

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the Knee

Osteoarthritis of the knee describes the loss of cartilage in the knee joint. Patients with osteoarthritis will experience sore and aching pain of the knees with stiffness and pain with sitting and walking. Treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee can include medications, physical therapy, injections, and joint replacement surgery.

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patella-dislocation

Patella Dislocation / Subluxation

The knee cap, also known as the patella, can slip out of its groove and dislocate or subluxate. This is often due to trauma or a laxity of the ligaments that secure the patella in its groove. Patients will commonly report pain with climbing stairs or with lateral motion following a patellar dislocation. Treatment includes bracing, medications, and physical therapy. If the issue is recurring frequently, surgery may be necessary.

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patellafemoral-chrondo

Patellafemoral Chondromalacia

Patellafemoral chondromalacia refers to the wearing out of the cartilage on the back of the patella (knee cap). Patients will often describe pain with squatting, kneeling, or walking down stairs. Treatment varies and includes medications, physical therapy, and injections.

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Filter Conditions by:     AllShoulderElbowHipKnee
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